Addiction Quotes

Addiction Quotes

 

22 thoughts on “Addiction Quotes

  1. Gina

    Update: My addicted son turned 40 years old in 2016.
    A few days prior to Easter, he suddenly contacted his younger brother in order to “bond” with him.
    Translation: Addicted son, as he’s done prior, was trying to triangulate, blame me for his lot in life/refusal to subsidize/enable his drug addiction.
    It was unsuccessful & addicted son was enraged.
    On Easter, he or someone he instigated to do so, texred me naked male photos & prompted me by name to…
    It was a wakeup call for me.
    While I’d installed/maintained boundaries with addicted son, communication access was maintained in case he decided to get clean.
    Instead, this turn of events inspired me to change my phone number.
    Addicted son, one more time on Mother’s Day of that year, along with his eldest step-daughter, (whom I’d considered to be my grandchild), sent me a FB message to wish me a Happy Mother’s Day & to say they loved me.
    My DIL had divorced addicted son & married someone else who appears to have provided a more stable home for the grandchildren than they’d ever experienced.
    Meanwhile, ex-DIL’s own mother passed away unexpectedly three months later.
    She was a stable influence with her grandchildren.
    Addicted son has long destroyed any relationship the grandchildren & I shared.
    So, my grief about my adult addict son is tempered by all the collateral damage he’s created around him.
    There’s a saying that there’s a difference between being a relative & being a family member.
    This might sound like a “downer” and while I do get angry when discussing it, I realize that all of it is out of my hands.
    * my then 49 year old addict brother overdosed & died some years back.
    One thing I can tell you, (for myself), that as devastating as that was, I came out the other side realizing that I’d have done the same tough love all over again if I had to do it all over again, (which I am).

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  2. Laura Del Ciancio

    My husband and I have custody of our toddler grandson since March 2016. Our son is 38 and has been an addict for over 20 years. Our grandson and his 9 yr. old sister from another daddy were living with their mother who was found to be allowing her house to be used as a drug den. After several attempts we were able to have the police get the children to safety. We have tried to help him many times but found we were only enablers so we finally found the courage to put him out. Heroin is the drug of choice and we have almost lost him several times. We are losing hope and our health is being greatly affected. Your page is a Godsend.

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  3. Colleen G.

    Loved Joey’s Song. You had a lot to say that really resonated with me. I have struggled with my son’s addiction for 10 years now. He spent 6 months locked up in jail and in rehab and then overdosed 4 weeks after he was released. I am hoping what you had to say can help me get ready to let go. However, my other son who was 39 died unexpectedly of heart failure 6 months ago, and I don’t know if I have the strength to go through anything more.

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  4. Jenn

    My parents have been alcoholics ever since I remember probably since I was about 11. Im now 28 yrs old still dealing with it my parents are married and they enable each other my dad doesn’t care about hisself or my mom. My mom says she still wants help then I try let her stay with me she stays one night leaves the next morning! Shes 100lbs there relationship is holding on just so they can drink together that is all they have nothing in common just to drink! My dad has lost his mind on alcohol and I dont trust him at all bc I dont know what he would do when he drinks! Im struggling bc they have done this for too long to us kids.. and I have two kids of my own. I dont know what the right decision is to let the kids to continue to see them live there drunk lives or cut them out from there lives for good.. in less there sober I told her shes done seeing them but I don’t think she cares alcohol is there life. All they care about! Im going to watch them.kill.themselves and have to bury them. Is that fair no but it’s life its really affecting me as a person and I know I will never become them. Ive dealt with my own demons and moved on from that lifestyle and I wont go back I want to live and be a good sober parent so my kids wont suffer like we suffer dealing with them always worried whats going to happen next… ive gotten them help before my dad but mom had never been into treatment anyone have any advice im dying inside too bc this is what they choose.. please anyone know what could help

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  5. Gina

    Enablers= codependents. They think they’re helping the addict but in actuality, they are helping to facilitate the
    addicts usage of drugs.
    I think there should be an exception to this term when it comes to the mother of an addict.
    She comes from a very different place when she “enables” her child.
    She carried that baby in her womb. She birthed that baby into the world.
    She gathered that baby in her arms and loved, fed, and nurtured it.
    She was there for the first tooth and long nights walking the floors, her baby wrapped up in her arms.
    She was the one who celebrated the milestones; turning over, crawling, walking, riding a bike.
    She was the one who shared the wonder all over again through her baby’s eyes at holiday time.
    Home became a home because of that baby.
    It may have been a home before, but that baby centered everything into what was important in this life.
    Family. Love.
    With each tug away, she released her hold on that baby as he/she grew up.
    The first heartaches may have been for the child, but the mom felt them too as she quietly closed the door
    after comforting her baby, and a tear found its way down her cheek.
    We let them go because we’re supposed to, but it goes against all we’ve ever felt or known about that precious
    life we brought into this world.
    And now, we struggle because the terms codependent and enabler are intertwined in intent.
    For the friend enablers, they benefit from their “friend’s” use; addicted to the addict’s highs/lows, getting drugs from them, are addicts themselves or they have this twisted reality that somehow “nurturing” the addict equates cure.
    We mothers just want our babies to be ok, to be safe, to feel love.
    I am the biggest baddest mother to my addict son. He cannot understand why I won’t enable him.
    I won’t enable him because that is the equivalent of walking him to a cliff and telling him it’s ok to jump.
    And that would go against everything that a mother stands for.

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  6. Steph

    Thank you for your courage and willingness to share your experiences, thoughts and feelings. Our 17 year old son is an addict and our whole family has suffered for over 2 years. We have left no stoned unturned to try and provide him with whatever help is available. What I’ve learned is that it was not just for him; it was for us, as his parents too so that, at the end of the day we could believe there isn’t anything we wouldn’t do for him and that after it all he MUST know how much we love him so that will fix it, right? No. Wrong. He has to save himself. So many if your quotes resonate with me and are just what I needed to hear today.

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  7. mark

    To love a addict is to run out of tears
    it hit home my wife is a addict I love her and hate the addict it’s the hardest thing to live with I feel alone and it’s very comforting to know there is other ppl out there like me thank u for this page

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  8. Gina

    I stumbled across some of your quotes with pics on the Internet.
    I love the one with the candle & message:
    “Hug the mom of an addict today. Addiction is so uncomfortable she is often left to suffer great pain alone.”

    My son is going to be 38 in a few months.
    In February of this year, I released him, said I loved him, wasn’t mad at him, gave him my phone number to call or text if ever he wanted to. Detach with love, they call it.
    Before then, it was long periods of avoidance, secrecy, swooping back in trying to con, lying, cruelties. All the things addicts do to the ones they love.
    Enablers. I used to feel great distain & frustration with. How can they not see that no consequences means no chance to evaluate & change the path.
    And THEY were angry at me!! What kind of a mother are you?!
    The kind who refuses to walk her child to the cliff’s edge & say. “Ok. You can jump!”
    I’m not new to this.
    I’ve been down this road before with my late brother.

    You have a great site.
    Thanks for saying it the way it is.

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    1. Mom in WV

      Same here. A daughter who will turn 25 in August this year. She’s been in and out of jail/prison since she was 18, in trouble long before that. Every time I would help her I would find out she was just using me for the benefits. Once I stopped those benefits, she hated me. She never called. Never came around. Told people I was mean to her was why she left home. She has 2 beautiful children. A 5 1/2 year old son that I have had since his birth. His father was in prison at the time of birth on federal drugs and firearms charges. He calls me Mommy and calls his Mom by her first name. Now I have to fight for custody of my grandson because the father has now decided he wants him. He’s cheated all of his drug tests and is now off probation so I fear the worst. My daughter also has a daughter of her own, now 8 months old and lives with her young father and his parents over 6 hours away. Brother and sister will never get to know each other during their childhood, play as siblings should, etc. All because of my daughter. The sad thing is, she doesn’t even seem to want to change her bad habits. She doesn’t even care that she has lots her children. I have turned my daughter in to the police, several times, because she was a wanted fugitive and was on drugs bad. People asked me how could I turn my own daughter in knowing she was going to jail. Its like I told them, BECAUSE I LOVE HER, is why and BECAUSE I DON’T WANT TO BURY HER, is why. They STILL don’t understand!!! But guess what?!!! I don’t care what they think. My daughter is safe, at least for the next two years.

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      1. Bonny Frauenholtz

        I too, have turned my daughter into the police/probation. It was to save her life. She has been an addict for 10 years. Her downfall began with a rape where she was drugged. I warned her about people drugging girls and to be aware of her drinks but she had the attitude that everybody is good and nothing bad will happen to her. 10 years later, she has been in jail and prison multiple times. she has been in rehab several times. I have let her come home and had to kick her out time after time. I will not let her move back home again. The only help she will get is treatment. The past 10 years has caused a division with the rest of my family including my other daughter. My other daughter and I still talk but it will never be the same. My daughter has been missing for the longest time ever. It has been over a year since I have seen her. The longest in the past was 6 months. This time, I changed the locks on her because she would come in while I was gone with her friends and use in my home. She has stolen from me. She has abused me physically and mentally. Several tines, I have had to look for the car that I owned that she took off with. It usually took months to find the car. The only thing that has stopped her in the past and brought her back to me was to be arrested. This time, she is off probation so it will take a new charge to have her arrested. I know it is only a matter of time. She was released from probation because she finished her last sentence in prison. I do not know what to do anymore. I too have bill collectors calling me. She has medical bills that are unpaid where she required treatment for injuries related to her addiction. The only reason that I know she is still alive after a year is that I see the ads she places online for escorting, which is how she supports her addition. She has used meth, heroin and cocaine. She went from a beautiful girl, a cheerleader in high school, a scholarship for college, a year and a half from her degree to an addicted prostitute with a felony record.

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  9. Debbie

    I have watched my baby boy become an addict over the last 10 years. I have tried to help, pushed for treatment, called the police, bailed him out, then realized I was not helping. Letting go seemed to draw him more into that culture of having to get money to buy his own drugs since his abusive badgering of me no longer worked. And he blamed me. Talk about having to be strong!! The manipulation was horrible. His lack of concern for ANYBODY was confusing. But I knew who he use to be. And that is who I believe he still is, only masked by the cravings, withdrawals, need, and control that a substance has on his body. We mothers/parents are not alone!

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  10. Tracy

    I let go about two months ago and have been feeling so much guilt. Just hearing you say that letting go is not giving up is so helpful. Thank you for your supportive words. Looking forward to reading your book.

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  11. Amy

    Really like your site….. Loving and addict is hard work…. To say the very least. I’m struggling to let go…… It’s hard.

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  12. Barbara Dayhoff

    I meant to say I am enjoying myself and my family without the use if drugs and alcohol! This is a Beautiful Website! Thank you I have enjoyed looking at the photos and comments am blogs! Thanks again

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  13. Barbara Dayhoff

    I look forward to reading up more on Addiction! The disease I fight everyday of my life! I have been sober for 33 months and these past almost 3 years have been the best years of my life! I am starting to find out who I really am! I love not having to fake the funk and pretend that I am having a good time an enjoying life! I really have started to enjoy myself and my family and I feel genuine about it!

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